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Jessica S

Age range: 30-45

Welsh accent Commercial ...

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Welsh accent Edwards Coa...

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Lowri

Age range: Teen-30

Slight accent Save the C...

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Welsh accent 'Large Fami...

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English RP & Welsh accen...

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Melanie

Age range: 20-40

Welsh accent Airbnb Comm...

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Soft Welsh accent Commer...

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Soft Welsh accent Jersey...

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Sarah D

Age range: 30-50

English CK Euphoria Comm...

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English Bali Travel Promo

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English 'Think' Promo

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Home studio

Simon G.

Age range: Kids-25

Italian Compilation

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English with Italian acc...

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Welsh accent Commercial ...

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Tom

Age range: 18-40

Welsh Compilation

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Welsh general accent Shi...

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English Audiobook

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Tom M

Age range: 25-45

Welsh Compilation

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English Compilation

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Welsh accent Compilation

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Welsh is a Celtic language spoken in Wales, with a current population of over 3.1 million. Before the coming of the Roman Empire, Celtic languages were spoken across Europe. Present-day place names indicate the extent of their influence: the town of Bala in Turkey and the city of London in England both have names with Celtic origins, as do the rivers Danube, Rhine and Rhône. Welsh is also spoken in the Welsh colony of Patagonia, Argentina, and in Australia, Canada, England, New Zealand, Scotland and the USA. The language is spoken day-to-day and understood by the majority of the population in the Snowdonia Mountains and Coast region; they are truly the heartland of the Welsh language.

Welsh is the oldest language in Britain dating back possibly 4,000 years, from Indo-European and Brythonic origins; the Romans were the first to commit these words to paper, introducing elements of Latin still present today. Historians see clues in the prose of the earliest Welsh poets, writing between the fifth and eighth centuries. They pinpoint Early Welsh, Breton and Cornish as being related.